The 2021 NFL draft was held April 29 through May 1 and every Chicago Bears draft pick has been analyzed here.To get more news about [url=https://www.bearsbuy.com]bears jerseys[/url], you can visit bearsbuy official website.

 

After last season’s virtual draft, Cleveland was playing host to festivities this year with a handful of potential draft picks present and socially distanced because of COVID-19.My take: Chicago Bears general manager Ryan Pace had to swing for the fences with Fields available at No. 11. The Bears paid a hefty price (including next year’s first-round pick) to move up nine spots for Fields, but the payoff could be enormous. Finally, the Bears gave their fan base reason to be excited. Veteran Andy Dalton may still open the year as Chicago’s No. 1 quarterback, but it’s only a matter of time before the job is turned over to Fields, who had a terrific collegiate career at Ohio State. Now the Bears have to hope they chose the right guy, unlike Mitchell Trubisky in 2017.

Quarterback connection: The Bears are confident the proper infrastructure is in place to mold a young quarterback. On Tuesday, Pace waxed poetic about how so many of Chicago’s current offensive coaches — head coach Matt Nagy, offensive coordinator Bill Lazor and quarterbacks coach John DeFilippo — are former quarterbacks themselves. The Bears also believe the quarterback room with Dalton and Nick Foles will be a positive place for Fields to learn and develop.

 

What’s the plan? : The Bears are still paying Dalton $10 million in 2021. In all likelihood, the Bears want Fields to sit behind Dalton and Foles to learn and observe. The Bears wanted to do the same with Trubisky but Mike Glennon struggled so badly over the first four weeks of the 2017 regular season that Trubisky was forced into action before he was ready. Chicago does not want to make the same mistake twice. Bears fans will be clamoring for Fields to take the field, but under no circumstances can the Bears mess this up. Too many jobs are on the line for Fields not to pan out.

My take: Love the pick. Jenkins should be the Bears’ starting right tackle in Week 1. Many believed Jenkins was going to be a first round-pick, but Chicago traded up to grab him at No. 39 overall. The Oklahoma State product had a highly productive collegiate career and plays with a mean streak. Not only did Chicago waive goodbye to veteran right tackle Bobby Massie in the offseason, but starting left tackle Charles Leno’s contract expires after the 2021 season. This choice checks all the boxes. The Bears have to be thrilled after their first two picks of Justin Fields and Jenkins.

My take: The Bears entered the draft determined to add depth on the offensive line. After moving up to take Oklahoma State tackle Teven Jenkins (future starter) in the second round, the Bears used their first pick on Day 3 on Borom, who played both tackle and guard at Missouri. The interior of Chicago’s offensive line is a team strength, but the Bears are making changes on the edges. Jenkins is expected to initially replace veteran Bobby Massie at right tackle, but left tackle Charles Leno Jr. is in the final year of his contract. Borom will enter the league as a reserve, but the Bears hope he develops into more. Keep in mind, the Bears are very high on offensive line coach Juan Castillo’s ability to mold young offensive linemen.